Thursday, June 23, 2011

"Philosopher" Nietzsche's "happiness of the knife"

I've given up on trying to make sense of Thus Spake Zarathustra, which reflects a deranged mentality. Because reason and reality weren't Nietzsche's strong points, to put it mildly, he lends credence to his mindless assertions by tapping into a) the original Zarathustra's authority (which in reality is based on the fact that he was an initiate); and b) the authority of the Bible, by using stilted, old-style language. (Note that, during WWI, each German soldier was provided with a copy of Thus Spake Zarathustra along with a copy of the Bible, perhaps indicating this same strategy. By this time, organized Satanism's body-snatching drive was well underway, and soldiers in wartime make some of the best and easiest "recruits" if their morality can be modified suitably.)

The actual basis for Nietzsche's "authority" in the present is his usefulness to organized Satanism, which clearly promotes certain books of his, i.e. the ones which were largely dictated to him by Satan, in order to convince its preferred recruits that wild abandonment to one's lowest instincts (Dionysianism) is based on a sound philosophy, which in turn is based on "sound science" (Darwinism).

I did run across the following intriguing passage shortly before throwing in the towel on Thus Spake Zarathustra:
Hearken, ye judges! There is another madness besides, and it is BEFORE the deed. Ah! ye have not gone deep enough into this soul!

Thus speaketh the red judge: "Why did this criminal commit murder? He meant to rob." I tell you, however, that HIS SOUL WANTED BLOOD, NOT BOOTY: HE THIRSTED FOR THE HAPPINESS OF THE KNIFE! [emphasis added]

But his weak reason understood not this madness, and it persuaded him. "What matter about blood!" it said; "wishest thou not, at least, to make booty thereby? Or take revenge?" [In other words, the murderer came up with a cover story for his blood-lust, i.e. robbery, because he couldn't admit to himself or others that he enjoys killing. I assume that at the time the book was written, the sentence for murder committed in the course of robbery would be the same for murder for no apparent reason (death sentence), so the killer wouldn't necessarily save his neck by lying about his motive, although he might avoid mistreatment, abuse, torture, and/or a more heinous form of execution. These days, blood-lust can earn you a position as a right-wing elder statesman.]

And he hearkened unto his weak reason: like lead lay its words upon him--thereupon he robbed when he murdered. He did not mean to be ashamed of his madness. [I.e. the motive for creating a cover story wasn't remorse, but self-preservation, since a robbery is merely a criminal human motive, whereas blood-lust is sub-human.]

And now once more lieth the lead of his guilt upon him, and once more is his weak reason so benumbed, so paralysed, and so dull. [He feels guiltier for robbing someone after murdering them for the fun of it? Perhaps that's why he then becomes so confused.]

Could he only shake his head, then would his burden roll off; but who shaketh that head?

WHAT IS THIS MAN? A MASS OF DISEASES THAT REACH OUT INTO THE WORLD THROUGH THE SPIRIT; THERE THEY WANT TO GET THEIR PREY. [emphasis added]

WHAT IS THIS MAN? A COIL OF WILD SERPENTS THAT ARE SELDOM AT PEACE AMONG THEMSELVES--SO THEY GO FORTH APART AND SEEK PREY IN THE WORLD. [emphasis added]

Look at that poor body! What it suffered and craved, the poor soul interpreted to itself--it interpreted it as murderous desire, and eagerness for the happiness of the knife. [In other words, according to Nietzsche's "Zarathustra," the soul twisted pain and desire into blood-lust. Once again, Nietzsche simply makes an insane assertion with no attempt to reconcile it with reality. But interestingly, it has the effect of distracting us from demonic possession, which is so clearly reflected in the preceding text which I have emphasized.]